Kimberly Wyatt’s Ice Dance Workout Revealed

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For former Pussycat Doll Kimberly Wyatt, dance and fitness are pretty much in her DNA. She toured the world with the girl group for seven years and made a name for herself as the one who does standing oversplits (as hard as they look, yeah) like it was NBD, so participating in the new series of Dancing on the ice was right on his street.

When we met her, it was clear she lives for what she does, but now a 39-year-old mother of three, she’s learned more about exercise by training for it. DO I than ever before. And, turns out, these are things you could all benefit from. Take note.

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1. Consistency is key

Kimberly has been training two hours a day, five days a week for the past nine weeks before the launch of Dancing on the ice. Truly. Obviously that’s his job, so we’re definitely not suggesting you have to do the same thing besides maintaining a regular 9-5, but sticking to a consistent routine (even two or three workouts a week) is where you reap the rewards.

“These nine weeks of training have been really intense,” says Kimberly W.H.. “And I focused on being the best skater I could be in a very short time.”

Here’s exactly what every morning in training for DO I looks like.

  • 6:15 a.m.: Wake up, stretching and muscle strengthening session at the gym
  • 7:20 a.m.: prepare breakfast for the children, school run
  • 9 a.m.: Arrival at the ice rink for:
  • 30 min warm-up (off-ice start, then move to the ice rink)
  • 30-minute on-ice drill practice – performing turns and steps like “mohawks” (your guess is as good as ours)
  • 1h30 of choreographic practice on ice
  • 20 min cooling

    “There are also days when we will leave the ice to do lifts and things before entering the rink,” adds Kimberly.

    2. Set measurable goals

    Having an end goal in mind will almost always give you more motivation. Facts only. Kimberly knows the deal.

    ‘My exercise routine before Dancing on the ice was more of an “as you go” approach. It was more about being a mom and teaching dance here and there, but now I have something to practice with and I know what I want from my body. I wake up with no other choice – you have to get out of bed because you have to go stretch and get ready. I’m a mother of three, but I also want to be the most amazing figure skater I can be.

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    what was she doing before DO I took over? Jogging, hot yoga, and ballet were her killer combo. “I would always go for a big jog at Virginia Water or around the canals,” she told Us. “I was also doing a lot more hot yoga because I really wanted to save my joints. I’m also doing more ballet, which gives me a chance to heal my body after having three kids and dancing in stilettos with the Pussycat Dolls, because it’s not so hard on the joints.

    3. Celebrate small wins

    Managed one more representative? Did you run two more minutes? They may seem like insignificant improvements, but they are not. As humans, we have a natural (but completely illogical) tendency to be hard on ourselves and miss milestones like these on the reg.

    The truth is, recognizing them will actually give you the confidence to go further and achieve more, and that’s what Kimberly discovered during her skating journey.

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    “I take multiple falls before I nail moves like twizzles or mohawks, but the little wins along the way are so important because that’s when I can scream and get dizzy from what I’m doing. accomplished,” says Kimberly. “They are sometimes rare, but I like to see that I am progressing.”

    4. A *little* push can pay off

    Now, we’re not saying you should go to the gym to get where you want to be and punish yourself until you do, but a bit Pressure generally equates to progression. Kimberly has found her happiness.

    When asked the hardest thing about him Dancing on the ice training regimen, she says, “It’s tough on myself when I need it because I have to continually make progress but also know how to relax and love moving on the ice with Mark at the same time – I’ve learned to recognize that I’m not going to the Olympics, I want to be able to match Mark, but he’s a pro and I’m a rookie.

    5. Recognize and adapt to your body

    Whether you’re working on strength training, cardio, or whatever, you’ll be somewhere completely different on your journey next week than you are now. Likewise, in ten years your body (and mind) will have done a full 180. We are constantly changing, and it is so important that we adapt to these nuances. Kimberly says she noticed a seismic change in her body during DO I coaching.

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    “It was almost a form of recovery for me,” she says. “I felt the differences in my hips from carrying kids and having c-sections, so I had to work on tightening my abs and getting my pelvic floor back.”

    6. Fight fear

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    Exercise can be so daunting. Take the weights section of a gymnasium. Stepping into it for the first time can feel like stepping into the lion’s den (and they’re all watching you), when you might as well be wearing a blindfold when it comes to finding the weights you you are looking for. Kimberly knows it’s hard to get through, but she also knows it’s worth it.

    “When I teach dance, I always say be you, be fearless, be authentic. The thing about being fearless is really important, but it’s scary. I have to remember to practice what I preach in practice. , but I know what’s on the other side is worth seeing, even if it means taking a fall.

    7. Take training as time for yourself

    If nothing else, movement is like a big dose of self-care medicine. Kimberly tells him DO I his workout regimen reminded him how important and powerful exercise can be.

    “Coming into my little gym to have a second and connect with my body really sets me up for the day,” she says. “Having this moment to myself means that I attack it with a smile and energy, feeling like I had time for myself, not just for my children and my family.”

    8. Train the brain

    The more intense Kimberly’s training has become, the more she pays attention to her stress levels, and it’s working wonders. “I consider it a marathon, not a race,” Kimberly says. “I worked on conditioning, listening and being aware of my body, but I also prepared myself for the nervousness and excitement of being live on TV and doing something that I didn’t. had never done before.

    “Journaling and making angel cards, using essential oils and taking magnesium baths help me stay calm so my nerves don’t run away from me.”

    Dancing on Ice starts tonight at 6.30pm on ITV and ITV Hub.

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